Facebook Pixel

COVID-19 has created a focus on spaces like Workspaces & Thinking Spaces, but what about Learning Spaces?

COVID-19 has created a focus on spaces like Workspaces & Thinking Spaces, but what about Learning Spaces?

For those of us in parts of the world who have been locked down during the Covid 19 pandemic, the concept of ‘space’ has come into sharper focus. In many ways, our space has shrunk and compressed, being limited to a room, an apartment, or a balcony. Lucky ones had access to a house and a garden. The ‘workplace’ became ‘the workspace’ for many working from home: a shed, a bedroom, a kitchen table.

We’ve become increasingly aware of our need for open space and recognised the value of a park, footpath or riverbank. Attention has shifted to local space. Being fortunate to live in the countryside I’ve noticed the coming and going of spring in my immediate environment with an intensity I’ve never experienced before.

However, as some spaces reduced, others expanded. Social distancing and anxiety has massively increased our awareness of personal space and made us seek out large, empty open places to reduce the risk of physical contact. The space between people is not just physical - family, friends and colleagues who may be located geographically close have seemed far away and remote as their lives have become more distant.

As lock-down eases, the need for space is driving business decisions, health decisions and controlling our daily lives.

However, throughout this, I’ve heard another repeated theme. Many people have talked about how an enforced break has created ‘thinking space’. I’ve also heard discussions about what people have learned through this time, about themselves, families and local communities as well as new skills and ways of working. Lock-down has accelerated the pace of change in many sectors, sweeping away ‘can’t do that’ attitudes and driving innovation.

So what do we mean by ‘thinking space’? How can we help people to create and use this internal space more productively? How can we help to structure the learning that comes from experience, so that it has personal meaning and can be integrated into our future lives?

________________________________________________________________________________

The RSVP Design Learning Spaces Model


At RSVP Design we have developed a unique model to support those involved in training, coaching and developing others. The ‘Learning Spaces’ model is based upon our expertise in experiential learning, combined with ideas from neuroscience, dimensions of learning and whole brain thinking. The model allows a skilled facilitator to guide learners through 4 different learning spaces, each with a focus on different thinking and behavioural skills. The four distinct spaces are referred to as The Workshop, The Laboratory, The Community and The Wider World. Together, they provide a holistic approach to programme design and delivery, encompass a broad range of learning and development objectives and challenge learners to develop through an exploration of their more and less preferred thinking and learning spaces.

Learning in the Workshop

This is the space in which practical, operational skills-based learning happens. It is a space for application, using tools, systems and procedures to construct, control and manage. It is often where hands-on, trial and error learning takes place and where processes and products are refined and improved

Learning in the Laboratory

This is the space in which more cerebral, intellectual learning happens. It is where critical, analytical and logical thinking skills are developed, where research is undertaken, where hypotheses are set up and tested and where data is analysed and evaluates. Learners build skills in making strategic decisions, building evidence based arguments and understanding cause and effect.

Learning in the Community

This is the space in which inter-personal learning develops in families, communities, peer groups and across cultures. Learning centres on the development of values, belief systems, relationships and emotional intelligence. Learners build skills in communication, influence, conflict resolution and resilience.

The Wider World

This is the space in which learners look beyond their own horizons, both spatial and temporal. They seek out new possibilities and new connections. It is where creativity and imagination develop, where new patterns are identified and where learning from one arena can be grasped, altered and applied in new challenges.

Ann Alder
Training Director

________________________________________________________________________________

The Learning Spaces Model forms the basis of RSVP Design’s face-to-face and remote trainer training and underpins our own learning design.  For more information or a discussion with Ann, Please contact us to discuss your interest in Learning Spaces.
We’ve become increasingly aware of our need for open space and recognised the value of a park, footpath or riverbank. Attention has shifted to local space. Being fortunate to live in the countryside I’ve noticed the coming and going of spring in my immediate environment with an intensity I’ve never experienced before. However, as some spaces reduced, others expanded. Social distancing and anxiety has massively increased our awareness of personal space and made us seek out large, empty open places to reduce the risk of physical contact. The space between people is not just physical - family, friends and colleagues who may be located geographically close have seemed far away and remote as their lives have become more distant. As lock-down eases, the need for space is driving business decisions, health decisions and controlling our daily lives. However, throughout this, I’ve heard another repeated theme. Many people have talked about how an enforced break has created ‘thinking space’. I’ve also heard discussions about what people have learned through this time, about themselves, families and local communities as well as new skills and ways of working. Lock-down has accelerated the pace of change in many sectors, sweeping away ‘can’t do that’ attitudes and driving innovation. So what do we mean by ‘thinking space’? How can we help people to create and use this internal space more productively? How can we help to structure the learning that comes from experience, so that it has personal meaning and can be integrated into our future lives?
________________________________________________________________________________